Anthropocene Epoch: The Age of Humans

Dutch chemist, Paul Crutzen popularised the term Anthropocene, the Age of Humans, that represent this human dominated geological epoch. His argument was based on the facts, 18 years ago, that human activity had transformed between a third and a half of the land surface area of the planet.

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The Great Auk Extinction Story – Extinct in 1844

The Great Auk was eighty centimetres tall, weighed around five kilos and looked like a large penguin. They spent most of their lives at sea but returned to land to nest. The great auk was a flightless bird and a fantastic swimmer and lived in the northern hemisphere. This bird ranged from Norway to …

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Sixth Mass Extinction of Life on Earth Caused by Humans

Human activity and exploitation as well as climate change and ocean acidification is causing populations of vertebrate animals and their habitats to crash. The study’s research reveals that this is in fact happening at an accelerated rate. We will soon enter a time period where most of the animal populations will reach unsustainably low numbers segregated in their terminally degraded habitats scattered around the globe.

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Northern White Rhinoceros – Functionally Extinct 2018

It is estimated that 8,000 rhinoceros have been killed by humans in the last 10 years alone. There are 21,000 rhinoceros left in the world today. The evolutionary history of rhinoceros goes back 50 million years. The Northern White Rhinoceros is a subspecies of the White Rhinoceros that is said to be descended from Ceratotherium praecox that lived around seven million years ago.

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2018 Living Planet Report – The End of Civilisation

The recently published World Wildlife Fund 2018 Living Planet Report reveals that we have killed 60% of all wildlife in the last 40 years. I would remind readers that as recently as 200,000 years ago we would have considered our ancestors wildlife by any of today’s definitions.

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Mammals on Death Row – Extinction is Forever

The period of time since the last mass extinction 66 million years ago, that killed the dinosaurs, is known as the Age of Mammals. Our own species is a child of this age. The study shows that it would take three to five million years for nature to recover the anticipated mammal species losses of the next 50 years.

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